I Think I Need An “Ask Me About” Button

You’ve seen those buttons that people wear, right?  “Ask Me About” something or other. I think I want an “Ask Me About EcoBrokers” button.  I’ve been an EcoBroker for three years and have had the National Association of Realtors Green Designation for two years. I proudly announce this on my website, on my email signature, on Facebook and Twitter.  But buyers and sellers never ask me about it, or how having these designations make me different from other real estate agents.  Yet they do make me different.  When I’m showing houses buyers don’t tend to ask me about the things that will affect their bottom line once they’re in a home—like “how energy efficient is this furnace or do you think I should replace the windows?”  When I talk about how the home’s orientation will affect their energy use for better or worse that information doesn’t seem to enter the equation.  Likewise, when I discuss walkability and potential resale value there is a clear disconnect.

Yesterday at an open house I had on my name badge and a button that said EcoBroker (not “ask me about” though). I had booklets on energy efficiency and my cards which say I’m an EcoBroker. Not one person asked, “What’s an EcoBroker.  Not one person picked up the energy efficiency booklet or asked about them.  Maybe I’m just nosy, but I would have asked.

Now I’m not expecting buyer and sellers to become tree huggers necessarily.  I mean, they don’t have to build straw bale homes and put solar panels up to bolster their “green” creds.  And I’m perfectly okay with my role as educator—to reach out to my clients and help them to be more informed about the personal environmental consequences of their home buying and selling decisions.  I would like to see the conversation around home buying and selling include questions like “Can you find out if the seller has made any energy efficient upgrades in the past few years or, “Will you advertise the fact that I’ve put in dual flush WaterSense rated toilets and EnergyStar rated appliances?” The answer from me would be YES to both of those questions.

There is no doubt that the future of home building and home renovations are moving toward more sustainable practices, especially in energy and water use.  Buildings make up 40% of all the energy used in the US.  Buyers and Sellers should understand how these new practices will impact their buying and selling decisions. They should also be aware of greenwashing, the practice of making questionable green claims in order to sell a product.  As an EcoBroker and NAR Green Designee, I can help to sort through the new world of thinking sustainably as a home buyer or seller.  So the next time you see me, ask, “What is an EcoBroker?”  Here’s a video of me describing why I became an EcoBroker.

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Gayle Fleming  703-625-1358    www.goinggreenhomesva.com    gayle@goinggreenhomesva.com

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The Reduce-Reuse-Recycle Approach To Giving Your Home a New Look

WITH A HOME STAGER

Let’s face it, at some point many people feel their home needs a face lift.  If your first inclination when this happens is to go out and buy new furniture or at the very least all new accessories, pictures, etc., think again.  One of the most important tenets of sustainability is to buy and use fewer things that deplete the planet’s resources or wind up in the world’s landfills.  The fewer things that you are responsible for disposing of in landfills, the lower your carbon footprint will be. repurposing is a powerful word and can also save a lot of cash. A keen professional eye can help us to rearrange furniture, accessories, art work etc. to create a home with a whole new look.

Many people know the concept of home staging either because they watch HGTV or because they’ve sold a home in the last few years.  As a real estate agent I was staging listings long before the recent popularity and profitability of staging.  We think of staging as something you do when we’re selling a home and want it to stand out and shine.  And it works.  Staging a home for sale will almost always cause it to sell faster than an un-staged home.  Often after we staged a home the sellers commented, “maybe we won’t move now” or “will you come and stage our new house.”

So recently I had an idea.  Just because we don’t go out and hire an Interior Decorator when we want a change doesn’t mean we couldn’t benefit from a little professional assistance of a less expensive kind.  Why not have a home stager do exactly what she/he would do if you were selling your home.  The idea of staging is to use what you already but arrange it in a more attractive way.  Sometime stagers will have you add extra lighting or accessories but first they work with what you have. Often they have you remove things that you may love but that make your home look cluttered or don’t necessarily add to it’s attractivness. The stager is not attached.

I asked a stager friend of mine about staging homes for people who are not selling and she thought it was a great idea. I’m going to take my own advice.  I live in a small space and have nice artwork, sculptures, pottery, etc. that I’ve collected over the years–too much, I admit, for my small space. I’m also bored with the the way that I arranged my furniture 5 years ago when I moved.  I don’t really need anything new but I desperately need a new look. So this spring I’m going to just do it.  I’ll let you know how it turns out. I’ll take some before and after photos.

BTW, not all home staging is equal.  A good home stager doesn’t make it obvious that the home is staged.  The home should still look livable and lived in.  Occasionally I go into a staged home with clients and they start laughing–at the table set for four with fake food on the plates, or the outdoor furniture used to “stage” the living room.  All stagers are not equal, so if you want a good one, call me.  If you’re not in my area, ask to see homes they’ve staged. Stagers cost $85-100 per hour for consulting.  They can simply tell you what to do or they can also help you to do it.

The Before and After in the photos above was borrowed from www.homestagingexpert.com

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Gayle Fleming  703-625-1358    www.goinggreenhomesva.com    gayle@goinggreenhomesva.com